Event: St George’s Day, 22 April

As well as being the Patron Saint of England, Baden Powell chose St George to be the Patron Saint of the Scout Movement and traditionally each year on the 23 April (or the nearest Sunday), Scouts remember the Scout Law and the Promise they have made. 
We hope that all our Cubs will be able to attend.

This year the District is holding its event in Parham Park on Sunday 22 April.

Timetable
13:30: Arrive at Parham Park.
13:45: Groups start to form up
14:00: St George’s Day service including renewal of Promises
14:30: Activities begin
16:00: End of activities. Depart Parham

How to get there
You will need to make your own way to Parham Park. Use the main entrance near Cootham on A283 and follow the drive through the park until directed off to the left to reach the East Plain. The postcode for satnav purposes is RH20 4HR and you can see a route online.

St George’s Day service
During the service, everybody will get the chance to renew their Promise. After the Beavers, Cubs will be asked to stand and make the Scout Sign. They will then say their Promise together with Cubs from across the District. This will be followed by Scouts, Explorer Scouts and Leaders renewing their Promises.

I promise that I will do my best,
to do my duty to God and to the Queen, 
to help other people 
and to keep the Cub Scout Law

Colour party
We will need somebody to carry the Parbrook flag and will select them at our Pack Meeting on 17 April. We don’t think that we need escorts this year but if that changes we will select them on the day. Group flags will line up behind the District Chaplin to provide a backdrop for the service.

What to wear
You should wear your uniform top and scarf. Unlike recent years we hope that it will be warm enough not to wear coats for the service although they may be useful to sit on. Otherwise please dress appropriately for the weather.
With the whole District wearing the same uniform it is a good opportunity to remind you to check that yours is clearly named, just in case you should get separated from it during the afternoon.

What to bring
Although there is no charge for the activities there will be some refreshments and stalls to raise money for the young people from the District who are attending the World Scout Jamboree in the USA in 2019. We hope that everybody will be able to bring around £2 to spend on the jamboree stalls.  There will be leather branding, s’mores, friendship bracelets and most importantly for the parents tea, coffee and cake.
Cubs may like to bring a water bottle to keep themselves hydrated through the afternoon but do make sure it is named and goes home again.

Who can come?
We hope that all our Cubs will be able to attend. We have created an event on My Scout so that you can let us know whether or not you plan to come.
Parents and siblings are all welcome to join us for the afternoon and will be encouraged to join in with the activities. As usual any non-Cub children will remain the responsibility of the adults that they come with.

What activities are there?
Each group will be running activities and there will be the Jamboree contingent stalls too. In addition the District will be running pedal cars, grass sledges and a soapbox rally.  The rally will have 2 tracks for younger ones and older ones and everyone is welcome to make a team of 3 (Scouts, Explorers, Network, Leaders) or 4 (Cubs and Beavers) to set their fastest time around the track.  There will be a prize in each category.
Jodie, the District Youth Commissioner, will have a graffiti wall where Cubs can leave their ideas and thoughts about Scouting. There will also be a selfie booth.


Baden-Powell & St George
Lord Baden-Powell chose Saint George to be the Patron Saint of the Scout Association. He felt that the Saint George of legend set a good example of faith, courage and perseverance. St George’s day is on 23 April and most Districts hold some form of celebration. In ‘Scouting for Boys’, Baden-Powell referred to the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian Legend and to St. George who was their Patron Saint.
He then went on: “He is also the Patron Saint of Scouts everywhere. Therefore all Scouts should know his story. St. George was typical of what a Scout should be.
“When he was faced by a difficulty or danger, however great it appeared, even in the shape of a dragon – he did not avoid it or fear it, but went at it with all the power he could. That is exactly the way a Scout should face a difficulty or danger, no matter how great or how terrifying it may appear. He should go at it boldly and confidently, using every power that he can to try and overcome it and the probability is that he will succeed.
“St. George’s Day is April 23, and on that day, Scouts remind themselves of their Promise and Scout Law. Not that a Scout ever forgets either, but on St. George’s Day, he makes a special point of thinking about them.”

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